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Water is Our Business

At Lower Cape Fear Water & Sewer Authority we have the capabilities to provide wholesale, regional raw water from the Cape Fear River at the Kings Bluff Raw Water Pump Station behind Lock and Dam #1 within our five-county service area comprised of Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover and Pender Counties.  Additionally, the Authority has the capability to supply a treated water supply from the Cape Fear River at the Bladen Bluffs Regional Surface Water System near Tar Heel, North Carolina.  The Lower Cape Fear Water & Sewer Authority is a self-supporting agency which depends on customer rates and fees to support its operations. Our purpose is to provide a reliable and dependable surface water supply as cost-effective as possible through economy of scale while operating on sound fiscal and utility principles.

Mission Statement

To provide and assist in providing water and related services that enhances the quality of life in the region.

Conservation Tips

There are a number of easy ways to save water, and they all start with you. When you save water, you save money on your utility bills. Here are just a few ways... Learn more...

Recent News

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Honoring the Memory of Director Earl D. Andrews

A resolution in memory and honor of Director Earl Andrews’ dedication and longevity of service as a member of the Lower Cape Fear Board of Directors was approved by the Board on July 10, 2017.  Director Andrews’ service and commitment to the Authority will be greatly missed. 

Click on the resolution shown below for a full screen view. 

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50 Inches of Rain

50 Inches of Rain

Hurricane Harvey, now downgraded to tropical depression Harvey, dumped 50 inches of rain on parts of the Texas coast this week. This epic storm has wreaked havoc on a large swath of the southwest and left destruction and devastation in its wake. When a large low pressure system moving in from the sea runs smack dab into a high pressure system over the coast, it’s a recipe for a natural disaster. Counter-clockwise circulating air vacuums up moisture from the Gulf, and all that warm, moist air rising up must eventually come down. And come down it did. “Harvey came inland about 200 miles south of Houston, and the outer rain bands pushed into Houston on Saturday. . . Houston lies a few dozen feet above sea level, and during normal rainfall residential yards drain into streets, streets drain into bayous, and bayous carry water into Galveston Bay and the Gulf of Mexico.

But this was not normal rainfall; it was extreme tropical rainfall. Meteorologists measure rainfall rates in inches per hour at a given location. A rainfall rate of 0.5 inches per hour is heavy, while anything above 2.0 inches per hour is intense (you'd probably stop your car on a highway, pull over, and wait out the passing storm). [In the Houston area], from 11pm to 1am that night, 10.6 inches of rain fell, about as much rainfall as New York City gets from October through December. That happened in two hours.   Ars Technica

 

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